Hydration Guidelines for Marathon Runners: Spring Marathon Training Plan Part 8

The Running Bug
The Running Bug Mon, Feb 20 2012 12:18 PM

Hydration Guidelines for Marathon Runners: Spring Marathon Training Plan Part 8

Hydration is one area of marathon preparation where you really have to make an effort during training to create your individual plan. Putting the time in to get your hydration right will certainly pay dividends on race day. Follow our guide below to create your own personalised hydration plan.

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Posted

I ran in Edinburgh's Marathon last Sunday in our freak May Heatwave.....It was a brilliant event and I loved taking part in it.  I do believe that the hot weather helped in a bizarre way, in that everyone set off at a reasonable pace, knowing that the heat would take its toll!!  I had two bottles of isotonic drinks on my belt, which I had frozen the night before, so as they defrosted I knew that my drinks would at least, still be cold.  I also carried a small bottle of frozen sports drink in my hand.  I took bottles of water at EVERY water station....I do believe that once your thirsty, then you're already dehydrated and having passed at least 5 or 6 casualties on the roadside, I do believe that my regular intake of drinks kept me going.  I finished in 4 hrs 33 mins.  I was aiming for 4 and 1/2 hrs prior to the heatwave, so the fact that I still managed that time, I am convinced that my regular intake of drinks and energy gels, kept me on track.  

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Posted

I also run 5K to 10K.  I am opposed to this over-emphasis on hydration.  Sometimes in the 5K parkrun in the middle winter I see people carrying water bottles.  I believe thirst is the best guide despite a clamour of people saying the opposite.  Do you have to tell dogs and cattle when to drink?  People forget that most foods also contain a lot of water, especially vegetables and fruit but also meat, fish and cooked rice etc.  Your water requirement per day should include this element....it doesn't all have to be from a bottle.  As a general rule, I drink adequate fluid mainly as milk and tea (I hate water unless really thirsty)and avoid all processed foods with added salt.   My theory is that the more sodium you take in from food, the more liquid you need to drink.  Salt makes you thirsty...pub landlords know that too well!  After all sea water is dehydrating and kills you in the end.  I never feel I need more than a slirp of water before a run and seldom take any water at the 5K station in a 10K unless it is particularly hot weather.  I've never felt any adverse effects.  I think perhaps because of my low sodium intake, I need less hydration during a race.  Otherwise I might end up with hyponatremia. If I ran a half marathon or marathon I would drink as I felt necessary.

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Posted

I only run up to 10K's at the moment but still find that the correct level of hydration is very important as to how I perform. However, every time I have tried to drink (or eat) within 4 hours of starting a run, I always get chronic stitch, which stops me mid run, therefore I nearly always run feeling thirsty..any ideas? Thanks.

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