OUCH!

LisaPizza LisaPizza
so now my swollen knee has progressed to hip pain after running too.
The guy from the website suggested to me mentioned it could be my trainers, but I have only had them just under a year. Is this a long time to have trainers? Help!
respectthestupidity respectthestupidity

Posted

It depends how much you have used your shoes, and the type of running you do. It is regularly suggested that shoes last 500 - 600 miles, but there are huge variations depending on your running style, weight, and surfaces you run on.

It`s not impossible that your shoes could be causing this, but if you haven`t run at least 500 miles in them look elsewhere first. Have you recently increased mileage or speed . Have you recently changed running surface or terrain, e.g. adding hills or reps.
Go over your recent running events and look for anything like this.

It sounds to me like you need to stop running for a few days to let it settle. If it doesn`t then I`d recommend you seek the advice of a physio.
LisaPizza LisaPizza

Posted

Thanks for your response.
I`m will rest for a few days, then if it`s still bad next time I run I will try the physio route.
It`s odd how 6 months ago the idea of running was alien to me, and now the idea of NOT running is alien to me!

Thanks for replying ,

Lisa
Gromit Gromit

Posted

Hi Lisa, with all respect to RTS`s comments, could I offer you a personal experience and what may seem like conflicting advice,
(only on the Physio bit, not the fact that you need advice)...I have just followed your swollen knee thread, and now the "ouch" progression into hip pain!

Yes there may be an issue with you trainers, but I would suggest that it may also be your "bio mechanics", or in non medical speak, your posture!

Let me share my experiemce to give a point of refference. I was building my mileage base above 45miles per week, and started getting left leg hamstring pain.
I saw a physio who diagnosed a stiff left side sciatic joint, causing inflamation to my sciatic nerve which tracks down alongside, and also "fires" the hamstring, causing it to contract out of sync with my quads and tearing it.

Anyaway, a small fortune later the physio is still only treating the symptoms, and i`m still experiencing pain.

A sports scientist friend commented to me whilst I was running in a lab test for some research that I should consult a chiropractor, who would look at the mechanics of my running gait, and interaction of all the muscles and joints from the foot up.

4 visits later, my problem was solved and I completed the 120km Namibian Ultra with no muscle pain, during or after the event. He diagnosed a mis-aligned pelvis on the "right side" causing the left hand side to take up additional strain by compensating, causing the tightening of muscles and tendons, that were actually pulling the sciatic joint out and causing the knock on effect.

So I would recommend you consult a chiropractor first, as the cause may be in you foot strike, affected by either your pelvic alignment and or compensatory effect from a weakness in musculature. This will save you time and money. Explain thoroughly what has happened and when during the last two weeks since the knee pain started.

regards, Gromit
LisaPizza LisaPizza

Posted

thanks for your advice, i was actually thinking something was up with my posture. I went on a treadmill in my local running shop when i first started running and they sold me shoes for over pronating, which i do, and also my right leg turns out a bit when i run ( i must look a right sight!) anyway, the shoes didn`t work out, they were correcting something i had been doing for years and it hurt! The shop very kindly changed them for neutral ones, and did say that i might need to change again after i had been running for a while. It`s been six months now. The shoes have been great so far, and this problem has occured in the last few weeks, when i think about it thats when i started running a bit faster and for a bit longer ( though i cannot ever imagine running 45 miles a week, I dont think I even drive that!)
I was thinking of going into the running shop to see what they think, and also trying the chiropractor route. Thanks again
Lisa
Le Chef AKA Dan Le Chef AKA Dan

Posted

Sorry to jump in on someone else`s post but I am experiencing exactly the same thing as Lisa(pizza?), I have been running down the gym for a month which was fine, then a few weeks ago I Started to ramp up the speed/distance, only from half hr to 45 mins, and this small change has made my left leg get `sciatica` type pain in my hip and down leg. Had a quick e-chat with the fella here: www.training2run.com/index.html and he suggested shock absorbing insoles, so I shall try `em out and see how they go. (I would say that my gait is a bit `Shabby` to say the least and i`m about as uncoordinated as a drunk 3 legged spaniel! So maybe running technique has alot to do with it)

Dan
LisaPizza LisaPizza

Posted


My pain isn`t sciatic, but let me know how the insoles work out.
p.s...Come on you spurs!
respectthestupidity respectthestupidity

Posted

I have to agree with Grimit there. It needn`t be a physio. Could be a chiropractor, possibly even an osteopath, or sports bio-mechanist. The point is it probably needs a professional eye casting over it.

As Gromits experience shows, you may not, unfortunately, necessarily get the right person first time.

RTS
Gromit Gromit

Posted

Hi Lisa, just caught up with your thread again, you mention,
"also my right leg turns out a bit when i run ( i must look a right sight!)" this may also be part of the issue.

My piprformis muscle which is seated deep inside the buttock, and crosses the sciatic nerve, was giving pain as well as the sciatic nerve. The piriformis muscle controls the natural turning out mechanism of the hip joint. The "Illio Tibial Band" also runs down the outside of the thigh, and can have an impact in the knee, and the turning out of your foot.
Be sure to mention all these symptoms when you see your chiro/osteopath.

I am sure their initial consultation should cover all these issues, but don`t be frightened to prompt them with questions about these areas.
hope you get them resolved.
regards, Gromit
LisaPizza LisaPizza

Posted

Just thought I would let you all know that I have had my first appointment with my chiropracter, and he has straightened my pelvis, craked lots of joints and ground grit from my knee cap. Most painful, but very effective. He thinks 4 treatments should have me back running, but that I probably got injured by doing too much too soon, so let that be a waring to all you begginers like me!
Le Chef AKA Dan Le Chef AKA Dan

Posted

As a quick follow up, I bought a pair of sorbithane full strike shoe insoles and they have worked a treat, I can recommend them as helping to get rid of soreness due to running. (obviously I aint a medic and everyone is different, but you get my drift)
respectthestupidity respectthestupidity

Posted

Agree with you there Le Chef. Usually the first thing I do when I buy new running shoes is take out the insoles and replace them with a Sorbothane one.

RTS
BobbyGirl BobbyGirl

Posted

Hi There,

Interested in this as have been suffering knee pain - would insoles be worth a try? Would be wary of getting the wrong ones in case they made matters worse?? I don`t think I pronate overly but most insoles seem to be for this problem... Any thoughts / advice??

BG
Le Chef AKA Dan Le Chef AKA Dan

Posted

A lot of it is common sense, I dont think insoles can do you any harm, put it together with a good stretch before and after a run and if you still get pain calm it down and maybe think about a visit to a sport doctor/chiropracter (easily found in yellow pages).
At £15 insoles are dear but like I said they worked for me.
Try looking here for some stretches and other advice : http://www.training2run.com/index.html
BobbyGirl BobbyGirl

Posted

Cheers for the advice, may give the insoles a go.

BG
2045954 miles logged - last log: 2 minutes ago
Log some miles